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Smiling on the Phone: Does It Really Work?

Smiling On The Phone: Does It Really Work?

Smiling on the Phone: Does It Really Work?

If a smile widens on a phone call, and no one is there to see it, does it make a sound?

As it turns out, it does.

Smiles over the phone might be unseen, but they are most definitely heard.

The Power of Smiling on the Phone

It is standard advice in sales and customer service to smile while talking on the phone. In fact, there is even a term for this when applied to outgoing calls: “Smile and Dial.”

While this advice has been around for years, it is amazing how many people have still not been exposed to it. In addition to people who have never had foundational sales or customer service training, newer entrants to the workforce have almost never been given this advice. It’s not exactly the kind of thing they teach in school.

The ironic thing about this advice is that I’ve never trained anyone who questioned it or thought it was a joke. No one has asked whether there was research to back up the concept or stated that it was some sort of New Age hokum.

Smiling on the PhoneWhy? Because intuitively the advice makes sense. We all just sort of know it to be true.

Of course, I am one of the people who did wonder whether there was some research to support what seems obvious to all. Happily for me and other data geeks, there is some science to support the validity of smiling on the phone.

According to an article on Discovery, human beings can differentiate vocal intonation not only between a smile and a non-smile but among different types of smile.* “Smiling affects how we speak, to the point that listeners can actually identify the type of smile based on sound alone…”

And since 84% of the message over a phone is your tone of voice, making sure that “smiling tone” comes through is imperative.

So, if smiles can be detected over a phone, what can we do to remind our teams to smile before picking up the phone and saying hello? Read More

John DiJulius

The Secret Service Summit: John DiJulius Interview, Part 4

Last November, I had the pleasure of attending The DiJulius Group’s Secret Service Summit. After the event, I did a recap of this exciting customer service conference where I listed the speakers and broke down some of the better takeaways from each person. As you will be able to tell from the post, last year’s Secret Service Summit was an unbridled success.

I was fortunate enough to talk to conference founder John DiJulius about this year’s Summit and to get a little back story on how the Secret Service summit came into being. Check out the video below to learn more about this top notch customer service event.
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Secret Service Summit | Customer Service Conference

A Superb Customer Service Conference: The Secret Service Summit

I had the pleasure of attending the DiJulius Group’s Secret Service Summit last week. While many of my fellow bloggers were attending Blogworld in sunny Los Angeles, I decided to head a different direction entirely. After all, what’s better than November in Cleveland, Ohio?

It turns out that if you’re into customer service, not much.

The two day summit was filled with speakers who have lived the customer experience from different perspectives. Large company service experts such as Craig Russell of Starbucks and Michael Coburn of Nestle brought both B2C and B2B execution to the forefront, while speakers such as Dick Hoyt and David Wagner provided incredible inspiration.

Below is a a recap of the content from the conference. It will give you a sense of a customer service conference agenda, along with quick highlights and key takeaways to give you a sense of what you can expect if you want to attend next year’s Secret Service Summit.

Day 1: A Customer Service Conference with a Standing Ovation

Michale Caito, Restaurants on the RunMichael CaitoPresident & CEO, Restaurants on the Run, a multi-restaurant catering and delivery company that delivers over 150,000 meals per month. Mike told a great story about turning around Restaurants on the Run. His job matrix, which simplified the accountability and vital factors for customer care positions in the company was illuminating. Also, I was impressed to see that Mike was one of the few people tweeting during the Summit.

Key Takeaway: Using a report to track vital factors monthly.

 

 

Michael Coburn, NestleMichael CoburnDirector, Customer Service at Nestle USA. Coburn spoke a lot about the challenge of instituting a customer service mindset in a large company that is not forward facing to consumers. It was a fascinating look at a business whose products we all know but whose business we know little about.

Great Idea: Nestle actually has branded mirrors at each phone reps’ station so reps can see if they are smiling when they are talking on the phone.

 

 

Craig Russell, StarbucksCraig RussellSenior Vice President for U.S. Store Operations Services at Starbucks. Russell spoke a great deal about the transformation of Starbucks in 2008. Most fascinating was the breakdown of Starbucks’ work with John DiJulius to rewrite its mission statement and to create its customer service vision statement. The statement itself was takeaway enough.

Key Takeaway: “We create inspired moments in each customer’s day.”

 

 

Jack Mackey, Service Management Group Jack MackeyVice President at Service Management Group (SMG), where he helps companies guide and energize their people to deliver remarkable service. Some of you might have heard of Mackey before, as he is a popular speaker. And now I know why. He was a true pro — both funny and insightful. Mackey had so many great bite-sized takeaways that I will probably be quoting him in my Monthly Mashup for years to come.

Key Takeaway: “All business is personal. It goes where it’s invited and stays where it’s appreciated.”

 

Dick HoytDick Hoyt – Team Hoyt is an inspirational story of a father, Dick Hoyt, and his son, Rick, who compete together in marathons and triathlons across the country. There is really nothing I can say about Dick Hoyt, except that he is an incredible human being. The video below says more than I ever could about his story and message. If you do not take a good look at yourself after hearing his story, then you truly lack the capacity for introspection.

The team at the DiJulius Group wisely scheduled Mr. Hoyt as the last presenter of Day 1, and he was granted an extremely powerful standing ovation. A note to professional speakers everywhere: Make sure you never follow Dick Hoyt on stage. Unless your name is Bill Clinton or Tony Robbins, you probably won’t be able to pull it off.

Key Takeaway: We can all do better.

 

Day Two: The Heart of Secret Service

John DiJulius, Customer Service SpeakerJohn DiJuliusBest-selling author, consultant, keynote speaker, and President of The DiJulius Group. John, of course, spoke numerous times throughout the conference. On Day 2, he led a workshop drilling down into some of his core teachings, such as having a service vision and focusing on service aptitude when hiring.

Key Takeaway: Create non-negotiable standards for your team using an Always and Never list.

 

Panel Discussion: An interesting panel discussion covering a wide range of topics. Panelists included:

  • Rick Sonkin: Managing Partner of Sonkin and Koberna Co., LPA
  • Melissa Gottlieb: Vice President of Sales, Smart Business Network
  • Ron Higgins: President, Cogneato
  • Darlene Campagna: President, Direct Opinions
  • Ellen Jo Plass: Executive VP, TLC Laser Eye Centers
  • Dr. Dawn Hoslted: SR VP, TLC Laser Eye Centers

Key Takeaway: Email is not for communication; it’s for documentation. (We should all remember this one.)

 

Mark Moraitakis, Chick-Fil-AMark MoraitakisDirector of Service Innovations, Chick-fil-A. There is nothing quite like the retail environment, and it was truly illuminating to see the outlook on service Moraitakis and his team have instilled in the Chick-Fil-A organization. He also shared the company’s customer service training video, which readers of this blog are familiar with.

Key Takeaway: When your product is no longer unique, it is your service that will distinguish you.

 

Matt Stewart, National Services GroupMatt StewartCo CEO of National Services Group which operates College Works Painting and Empire Community Construction. Stewart told an interesting story about how a severely disgruntled customer waged a war against their company and brand and how they turned things around to make sure that never happens again.

Key Takeaway: Savor contrarian opinion and learn from it.

 

David Wagner, Life as a DaymakerDavid Wagner  – David Wagner is the best-selling author of Life as a Daymaker: How to Change the World by Simply Making Someone’s Day. Wagner’s message was more inspirational than instructional, and his speech told the story of his becoming a “Daymaker” and remaining one even as he battled cancer.

Key Takeaway: Whose day will you make today?

 

Final Thoughts

In the end, the Secret Service Summit was about both usable content and inspirational messaging. I have attended many conferences in the past few years, and I can say that I have never left a conference so excited about the possibilities and so full of actionable ideas. Literally, the biggest challenge we have had is triaging the ideas to figure out what to begin with.

I hope this recap helps those who are interested in customer service and customer experience optimization understand the quality and value of the Secret Service Summit. It is two days that are well worth your time.

Kudos to John DiJulius, Denise Thompson and David Wagner (the other David Wagner) for putting on an incredible event!

If you have any specific questions about the summit, feel free to ask them in the comments below.

John DiJulius | Customer Service Keynote Speaker

Monthly Mash: Customer Experience Tools and Secret Service

Volume 1: October 2011 Mashup

Welcome to the Monthly Mash, a mashup of tools, tales and tips on customer service and the customer experience from around the blogosphere.

Many thanks to those who participated and supported the naming of this series! You know who you are.

Customer Experience Resource: John DiJulius

John DiJulius | Customer Service Keynote SpeakerThis month’s spotlight is on John DiJulius, one of the premiere customer experience keynote speakers, authors, and consultants around. He has written two excellent books about customer service: What’s The Secret and Secret Service, both of which I highly recommend. I had the pleasure of seeing DiJulius speak at the Multi-Unit Franchise show this past spring, and his presentation was simply excellent. I mentioned the customer service video he showed during his talk in an earlier post.

I thought John DiJulius would be a fitting first spotlight for the Monthly Mash, as his work has been one of the bigger influences on my customer service thinking and, more aptly, because I am very excited to be attending his Secret Service Summit this week! One of DiJulius’ core teachings is having invisible systems (hence, Secret Service) that seamlessly help organizations deliver an exceptional customer experience. Please check out John DiJulius’ website, blog, and books. You won’t be disappointed.

The Month In Customer Service Blogging

A collection of the best posts about customer service and the customer experience I read this past month.

Someone Was Listening

Sometimes the most popular post from the previous month; sometimes just the one I am most proud of.

Thoughts on the Customer

In China a Zen master traveled with a few disciples to the capital and camped near the river.  A monk of another sect asked one of the disciples of the Zen master if his teacher could do magic tricks.  His own master, said the monk of the other sect, was a very talented and developed man.  If he stood on one side of the river, and somebody else stood on the other side, and if you gave the master a brush and the other man a sheet of paper then the master would be able to write characters in the air which would appear on the sheet of paper. 

The Zen monk replied that his master was also a very talented and developed man, because he too could perform the most astounding feats.  If he slept, for instance, he slept, and if he ate, he ate.

Buddhist Tale*

I’ve thought more and more about this story in recent years, as our lives have become increasingly intertwined with the technologies of the day. While there is a powerful lesson here for life, there is also a powerful lesson for anyone who touches a customer.

Our customers deserve our attention. Are you present in the moment and focused on the person you are serving? Have you left your inbox, To Do list, and voicemails behind while you focus on the customer and what they are saying about their needs? It sounds simple; yet, as most of us know, in today’s world, true focus might be one of the most difficult feats of all.

I hope you enjoyed the Monthly Mash. Feel free to share it using the social share buttons below.

*Please forgive the lack of attribution. I copied this from a collection of Buddhist stories over 15 years ago, and an exact word search on Google yielded nothing.